Thursday, January 30, 2014

Mottisfont Abbey - a Rose Lover's Paradise - II

As I don't have many roses blooming in my own garden right now and miss them very much, I feel I could need some winter cheer and decided to continue my series of posts about Mottisfont Abbey. Maybe many of you have the same desire and I hope you enjoy my second installment about this phenomenal rose garden. If you would like to see part I about Mottisfont Abbey Rose Gardens, please click here. The photos in this post are still all from the first walled garden that you enter when you visit the Rose Gardens (Mottisfont Abbey Rose Gardens consists of three separate walled gardens). In this part of the gardens many older David Austin roses, they also go by the name English Roses, are displayed.



When I saw this beauty my heart skipped a beat. Unfortunately, I couldn't find a name tag. I have no clue what variety this could be, but if you, my dear readers, have an idea and want to give it a try to identify it, please leave me a comment. I really would appreciate it!



Here is a close-up of the same rose. I feel the flower form and coloration is irresistible.

By the way, isn't it amazing how one wilted bloom can mess up a photo? Altogether I have to say though, that I was very impressed how well the gardens were taken care of and how meticulously the roses were deadheaded. I always wonder how many gardeners are working at Mottisfont Abbey Rose Gardens.



One last shot of the same rose together with rose friends and perennials taken from a different angle. For me the combinations of roses with each other and perennials at Mottisfont Abbey have never gotten old. Whoever designed the borders has been a true master.



Another rose that just took my breath away. This is an amazing specimen of 'Chianti', a shrub rose, bred by David Austin (United Kingdom, 1965). The color is a rare dark purple, which stands out even more because of the contrast with the yellow stamens. In addition to the intriguing color the rose has a great fragrance. Unfortunately, it is only a once-bloomer.

In Mottisfont Abbey Rose Gardens this rose was combined with a saturated yellow one (see the one yellow flower peeping out in the foreground), which just started to bloom. I am fairly certain that the yellow rose is 'Graham Thomas' also bred by David Austin. I have read that David Austin and Graham Stuart Thomas, the great rosarian, have been friends and that David Austin let Graham Stuart Thomas pick a rose, that he liked best from the ones that David Austin had bred, to be named after him. It always puzzled me that Graham Stuart Thomas, who was a great admirer and devoted advocate of the Old Garden Roses, choose such a bright, clear yellow and therefore almost modern looking rose, since most of the Old Garden Roses have a much more subtle and muted coloration.



In this border you can see the perfect layering of the roses in size from the big climbers in the background, to the moderate sized ones growing on standards in the middle ground, to the smaller ones in the foreground and all are inter-planted with interesting perennials. Even though this bed is not very wide, the effect is one of a full and lush border. In the following photos I will show you the individual roses from this border in close-ups.



The yellow-apricot rose to the outer left is 'Buff Beauty', a Hybrid Musk rose, bred by Bentall (United Kingdom, 1937).



Moving from the left to the right, the next rose grown as a standard is 'Geoff Hamilton', another shrub rose bred by David Austin (United Kingdom, 1997). It comes with a strong fragrance and I love its medium pink globular flowers very much and tried to grow it in my own garden in Southern California with disappointing results. The rose just didn't want to bloom and it is long gone. It is interesting how different the same rose behaves in different climates. 'Geoff Hamilton' seems to like the climate in England very much. I think, it is one of the most beautiful pink roses that David Austin has bred so far.



Close-up of an individual bloom of 'Geoff Hamilton'. How can one not love this rose?



The smaller roses in the front of the border are the 'Cottage Rose', another one of David Austin's creations. It was bred in the United Kingdom before 1991. The delicate, unpretentious, cupped, old-fashioned, pink blooms fit right into any informal cottage garden. At Mottisfont Abbey Rose Gardens it seemed to be a very floriferous rose.



The photo above shows the wall opposite to the one that I just described. I would have loved to take a shot of both walls together, so that you could get a better impression of the design, but they are very closely located to where you enter the Rose Gardens and there were so many people coming and going, that I wasn't able to take a shot without them on the photo.

Anyway, I assume, that the rose to the very right is 'Buff Beauty', again. It would make sense to plant it in this position to achieve symmetry. The dark crimson colored rose further more to the left was another absolutely stunning one. Its name is 'Crimson Glory, Climbing'. In the foreground the yellow rose is most likely 'Graham Thomas' and the dark purple one to the very left is 'Chianti', which I already wrote about.



'Crimson Glory, Climbing' is characterized by an incredible rich, velvety, dark, crimson-red color, very large blooms, and a strong damask fragrance. I regret, that I couldn't capture the color of this rose properly. It is way more deep and saturated in reality than on my photos.



I also like the bloom form very much.




What was interesting is that the label read 'Crimson Glory', 'Beales Form'. It didn't say 'Crimson Glory, Climbing', but judging by the size of the rose, I assume, that it is the climbing version of it. 'Beales Form' indicates probably that this is a clone coming from Peter Beales, another great rosarian and nursery man.

'Crimson Glory', the Hybrid Tea rose, bred by William J. H. Kordes (Germany, 1935) had sported into a climbing form, which is not unusual for roses, and was called 'Crimson Glory, Climbing'. Climbing sports of 'Crimson Glory' were found by Miller Bros (South Africa, 1941), Richardson (country of origin unknown, 1944) and Antonio Naungayan (United States, 1946) and maybe more were discovered, that were not publicly listed. Is the rose growing in Mottisfont Abbey one of the climbing sports that were found and registered and that I named above? Did Peter Beales found another one? It would be nice to know more about the climbing sport of 'Crimson Glory' that is growing in Mottisfont Abbey, especially because it is such an outstanding rose.

I feel that 'Crimson Glory, Climbing' is such a wonderful rose that it is a "must have", if you have the space to grow a climber. I myself think, that I will at least try out the 'Crimson Glory', the Hybrid Tea rose.



This row of light yellow roses grown on simple wooden pillars struck me as the only thing "being off" in Mottisfont Abbey Rose Gardens. The variety is 'The Pilgrim', a beautiful modern shrub rose, bred by David Austin (United Kingdom, 1991). I found the minimalistic, almost modern presentation of this rose very awkward and boring and in a stark contrast to all the other beautiful beds and borders at Mottisfont Abbey Rose Gardens. What makes it even worse is that this is the first impression that you get of the Rose Gardens as you have to walk through this part to reach the main entry. Wired! I wonder what the story is behind this design...



Here is a shot of an individual pillar.



But what I just wrote should by now means diminish the beauty of the rose itself. I feel, that 'The Pilgrim', with its darker yellow center and the light yellow outer petals, is one of the most lovely yellow rose that David Austin has ever bred.



Here is a close-up of a bloom of 'The Pilgrim'. Aren't they just lovely?



I don't know the name of this rose grown as a standard, but it is certainly pretty. I love the combination of it together with the white and blue perennials. I believe, the white one is a penstemon and the blue one is a catmint. It is also a very nice planting idea that would fit in any small garden!



Here is a close-up of the white flowering plant. I just adore it!



This is 'Marguerite Hilling', also called 'Pink Nevada', a Hybrid Moyesii shrub rose, discovered by Thomas Hilling (United Kingdom, before 1959) another striking specimen of a rose. 'Marguerite Hilling' is a sport of 'Nevada', which is presented in the next photo. The white flowering trees make an ideal background that let the rose stand out even more. Usually I am not so much into single roses, but this one makes me wish I would have a bigger garden so that I could plant it. 'Marguerite Hilling' is supposed to bloom in flushes throughout the season.



The lovely white 'Nevada', a repeat flowering Hybrid Moyesii shrub rose, bred by Pedro Dot (Spain, 1927).



The golden-yellow stamens and the yellow center of the blooms of 'Nevada' make a very charming contrast to the otherwise pure white flowers.



Again, I couldn't find a name tag for this rose. I believe it is a Polyantha. It would be good in front of a border and is a rose that also fits into a small garden.



Here is the picture taken of the same bush, but from the other side. I think it is a rather sweet little rose.



The last rose that I would like to feature from the Mottisfont Abbey Rose Gardens in this post is 'A Shropshire Lad', a modern shrub rose, bred by David Austin (United Kingdoem, 1996). The flowers come in a soft peachy pink color. This photo shows a bloom in the early stage...



... and this image another flower of 'A Shropshire Lad' opened to a very full, cupped shaped bloom form. This is one of my all time favorite David Austin roses. I don't grow it yet in my own garden, but I hope that will change in the future.

It was a great pleasure for me to put this post about the Mottisfont Abbey Rose Gardens together and I hope you liked reading it. In the next one in this series we will visit the second walled garden, which contains many Old Garden Roses. Besides lovely roses I will show some very beautiful peonies and other stunning plants that graced the borders.

See you in the garden!

Christina



49 comments:

  1. hallo Christina,

    ich freue mich, Deinen Blog gefunden zu haben. Wenn ich mir die traumhaften Rosenbilder anschaue, wird meine Wunschliste noch länger. Im vergangenen Jahr habe ich noch einige Austin-Rosen gepflanzt, auf deren Blüten ich mich dieses Jahr freue. Einen wunderbaren Vorgeschmack konnte ich beim Anschauen Deiner Fotos schon bekommen.

    Liebe Grüße
    Lisa

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    1. Lisa, welcome to my blog, I am happy that you found your way to my blog, too :-)! Thanks for your kind words about my photos. I am the same, I see nice photos of roses and I have to add the varieties to my wish list immediately, which is already endless... I am a big fan of David Austin roses, hope the ones that you planted last year, will be flowering wonderfully for you this spring!

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  2. This garden is a gem Christina, so many stunning blooms! And that second photo of yours reminds me of a Van Gogh painting that showcases the cycle of life in one composition, and very apt they are blooms too!

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    1. Mark and Gaz, Mottisfont Abbey Rose Gardens has truly an outstanding collection of roses and they are so well taken care of. Hmm, I wonder what painting of Van Gogh you mean. But if you see it from a philosophical standpoint maybe a wilted bloom in my rose photo isn't all that bad ;-)!

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  3. Dear Christina - the gardens at Mottisfont Abbey are always a delight to visit. I find it very difficult to recognise the different roses. At first I thought it might be Lady Waterlow, but I think she is a paler pink than your photo.

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    1. Rosemary, I wish I would live closer to Mottisfont Abbey, I think I would be there every week to see the roses! You are right, identifying roses is tricky, and even the experts have trouble with it, but maybe I get lucky and someone has just the right guess. Thanks for your input. I will research 'Lady Waterlow'. The color of the rose in question in my post might not be accurately represented on my photos or on your monitor or both and rose color can change tremendously with weather and soil conditions. So even though the color of my unknown rose doesn't seem to be completely right, 'Lady Waterlow' could still be a fit. Off to check her out on HelpMeFind...

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  4. Dear Christina ~ This is one of the most beautiful rose gardens I've ever seen, and it's because of you that I am able to enjoy it. To be there in person must have been such a thrill! I love the roses against the old brick.

    Thank you for sharing ~Have a wonderful weekend ~ FlowerLady

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    1. Lorraine, I couldn't agree more, Mottisfont is definitively one of the most lovely public rose gardens that I have ever been to. And, yes, it was a thrill to wander around the gardens, sit down on the nice benches to rest and take it all in and, of course, to photograph as many roses as possible :-). Even though the gardens are not too big in terms of the square footage, they are packed with roses and we have been there for hours. I am happy to share the photos on my blog and it is extra rewarding for me, when people are as appreciative as you are! Thanks!

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  5. J'imagine la joie que tu as ressentie au cours de cette promenade parmi ces roses dans ce jardin magnifique. Les rosiers anglais, je les affectionne tout particulièrement, ils se plaisent bien dans mon jardin. Je possède le rosier marguerite hilling , je vais le tailler plus court cette année, il se dénude de la base et quand je vous celui que tu nous offres dans ce jardin, il est bien feuillu jusqu'au sol.
    belle journée et merci pour cette belle sortie.
    jocelyne

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    1. Jocelyne, thanks, yes, it was truly a joy to explore this incredible rose garden! I also love David Austin's English Roses. Here in Southern California many of them get huge, much bigger than the size David Austin is listing in his rose catalog, so with my small garden, I can only have a very few. Oooh, you have 'Marguerite Hilling' growing in your garden?! How wonderful, since it is such a lovely rose. I have to watch out for photos of her on your blog in the future.

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  6. A lovely wander around the roses of Mottisfont. Geoff Hamilton and Shropshire Lad are old favourites of mine, but I didn't know Chianti, which is a stunning rose, although it is a shame it only flowers once. My Buff Beauty rose isn't growing as well as the one at Mottisfont!

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    1. Wendy, thanks, looks like we have the same taste in roses :-)! Are you growing 'Geoff Hamilton and 'A Shropshire Lad' in your garden? I would love to see photos of them. 'Chianti' is truly amazing, but in my small garden I prefer repeat flowering roses and stay away from the once flowering ones. I grow 'Reine des Violettes' to get that great purple color in my garden. She is just in her third year in the ground and should really come into her own this spring. Can't wait to see what she will do!

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  7. Mottisfont Abbey gardens are so beautiful, I enjoyed reading your post on this garden which I have not visited until now, but it is on my wishlist. The Crimson Glory climbing rose is one of my favorites too and is on my header of the Flowering Countrylife. Chianti is so beautiful too, I had this rose but did not grow in my garden and died. A Shropshire Lad I bought two years ago at David Austins roses in England and is a real gem. The pink climbing rose against the wall looks like "Pink Cloud", but I am not sure there are so many pink roses. As I said already before this post was lovely reading, your enthousiasm is infectious, haha.

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    1. Janneke, thanks, I am happy that you liked reading my post about Mottisfont Abbey Rose Gardens! Oh, 'Crimson Glory' is on your header? I didn't recognize it, but I will have a closer look next time I visit your blog. So sad that 'Chianti' died on you, but it happens with roses. I am envying you a little that you have 'A Shropshire Lad', but I am glad that this rose is doing well for you :-)! Hopefully at one point it will grow in my garden, too. I have no idea how this rose will do in Southern California, though. Thanks for giving it a try to identify my mystery rose. I will look up 'Pink Cloud'.

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  8. Oh beautiful! And the fragrance must have been heavenly.
    Geoff Hamilton is a favourite of mine too. Most of the roses I buy these days come from David Austin. They are expensive, but seem to do well for me. The form of the flower and the scent are always so good. I must visit Mottisfont one day.

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    1. Jessica, to my own surprise I don't recall any fragrance wafting through the gardens. I do remember some roses had a strong perfume, but I could only sense it, when I stuck my nose into them :-)! Ha, another fan of the incredible beautiful 'Geoff Hamilton'. Interesting to know that you mostly buy David Austin roses. They are certainly very lovely and I haven't seen one that I didn't like, yet. Here is the US David Austin Roses, that you buy directly from his company, are the most expensive roses on the market. Interesting how he got that done and people buy them like crazy anyways! Yes, you must visit Mottisfont one day, better sooner than later ;-)!

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  9. They are beautiful Christina. Something to look forward too. Interestingly I have 2 bushes flowering right now. It is still so wet with flooding but has been a mild winter. The blooms will be gone next month when I begin pruning.

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    1. Barbara, yeah, I am also looking already very much forward to seeing the spring flush this year! I have read on other blogs that England is having a very mild winter so far, but it amazes me that you still have two rose bushes blooming in your climate. Hopefully the flooding will stop soon!

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  10. Thank you, Christina, for sharing your beautiful photos. I love those walled gardens. Just the perfect background for roses. And 'Graham Thomas' is one of my favorite roses, even though I never thought I would like yellow roses! I have it growing on an old wooden fence but wish I had a brick wall!

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    1. Dorothy, thanks, I am also very much in love with the English garden walls, brick or stone, it doesn't matter do me.
      A rose growing friend of mine had a 'Graham Thomas' flowering in his garden and when I saw the deep, warm-yellow, saturated blooms I stopped in my tracks and had to admire it. It was a total standout in his garden. In my own garden though, I feel that a pure, intense, yellow doesn't go so well with all my more muted colored roses. If I had more space I certainly would design a garden area for the brighter, attention demanding colors! Anyways, I am glad you enjoy your 'Graham Thomas' rose!

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  11. Liebe Christina,

    danke für die wunderbaren Bilder. Eine Rose schöner als die andere. Mir persönlich gefallen ja die gefüllten Sorten am allerbesten. Ich kann mir nicht vorstellen, dass es Blumenfreunde gibt - die Rosen
    nicht lieben sind sie doch ein besonderes Wunder der Natur!
    Recht liebe Grüße aus dem schneereichen Österreich und ein schönes Wochenende
    Ingrid

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    1. Ingrid, thank you very much for your kind words about my photos. I also have a very soft spot for the full, cupped-shaped blooms. Well, I have met people, who are untouched by the sight of a rose, something that I can hardly understand, but of course I am biased ;-)!
      I try to imagine Austria covered with snow. It must be beautiful!

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  12. Absolutely stunning in every way! I do think they did a fantastic job with designing that bed of roses with the beautiful brick wall! Your eye just moves over that bed and is greeted by so many luscious colors and forms! What I would do to visit this garden!!! And those rose pillars are very pretty...it displays the roses in such a unique way! Your shots of the individual roses are AMAZING!!! You need to frame some of those!! A lovely weekend to you friend and thank you for taking us along to this magical garden! With all of the snow here I forget what green looks like! Nicole xoxo

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    1. Nicole, many thanks for your nice comment! I am also very fascinated by the design of the rose borders in Mottisfont. To me roses are not the easiest to combine harmoniously with each other, but they got it done perfectly. Interesting that you like the rose pillars! It just shows that people are different and have different tastes and that is definitively a good thing, otherwise all of our gardens would look the same.

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  13. Guten Morgen, danke für den schönen Beitrag. Wie immer sehr interessant. Bis jetzt war ich nur dies eine Mal dort, irgendwie liegt die Abbey nicht auf meiner Strecke.

    Sigrun

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    1. Sigrun, thanks for your nice words about my post. I wonder at what time of the year you have seen Mottisfont Abbey Rose Gardens. When the roses are in full bloom the gardens are just spectacular and I think it is worth doing a detour for this place ;-)!

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  14. Ohhh Christina I could walk and look around in this garden for weeks. So beautiful. A Shropshire Lad is living in my garden since last year and I love and I think it's my number one rose in my tiny garden. I hope you have much more photo's to show us from this garden.
    Have a fantastic weekend.

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    1. Marijke, I had the same thought! Even though we literally spent hours in this garden, I felt that it wasn't enough and would have loved to come back, but it was the last day of our England vacation. How wonderful that you have 'A Shropshire Lad' growing in your own garden and that you like it that much. Yup, no worries, I have way taken way more photos than I have shown so far.

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  15. Christina, you have addressed two of my passions: England and roses, especially the David Austin's of which I have 5 and hoping to add more. I have Shropshire Ladd. You know so much about the roses, I very much enjoyed your post. Are you suffering from the drought there?

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    1. Ann, thanks, how nice that we are sharing the same passions! Great that you have five David Austin Roses already and that you are growing 'A Shropshire Lad'. I find that it is a particular beautiful one.
      Yes, unfortunately we are having a bad drought here. I couldn't turn off the irrigation system the whole winter so far and it is very likely that we will get water restrictions this year. Today and yesterday we had a little bit of rain, but it is still way too less. But I continue to keep my hopes up. We could get rain until March.

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  16. You've put together a real treat for rose lovers there Christina. Is there anything more beautiful that roses growing over a brick wall - not in my opinion. I'm just getting into roses and oddly enough I was doing some research about growing a climbing rose in a similar fashion to those on the posts. I do think it's useful if perhaps there is no place to have a structure to grow it on.
    The pink, blue and white combo is my favourite and it will feature in my garden when I finally get round to sorting out the new trellis but I need an alternative for the white - penstemons don't do well here in my garden.

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    1. Angie, thanks for your nice words about my post! I agree with you that there is something special about roses trained on an old brick wall. How nice that you are getting into roses! I, of course, think that every gardener should grow at least one rose in his/her garden ;-), but obviously I am biased :-)! I also love a pink, blue and white color combination. Hope you find a good substitute for the penstemon.

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  17. Und ob mir Dein Post über die Mottisfont Abbey Rosen gefallen hat, liebe Christina! Ich bin beim Anblick der tollen Bilder fast in den Bildschirm hineingekrochen *lach*. Die beiden ersten Rosen, die Dir auch so gut gefallen haben, sind einfach traumhaft, vor allem Chianti, was für eine tolle Farbe!!! Leider habe ich bisher nicht so viel Glück mit den englischen Rosen gehabt, obwohl unser Klima dem englischen eigentlich sehr ähnlich ist. Geoff Hamilton hat in meinem Garten zwar geblüht, war allerdings nicht besonders wüchsig und im Hochsommer immer sehr stark vom Sternrußtau befallen, einen der letzten Winter hat sie dann nicht überlebt. Ich finde auch, dass sie eine der schönsten rosa Rosen von David Austin ist, ihre dicht gefüllten Blüten sind wunderbar nostalgisch.
    Vielen Dank für diesen wunderschönen Ausflug nach England!

    Liebe Grüße und ein schönes Wochenende, Bärbel

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    1. Baerbel, many thanks for your kind and enthusiastic words about my post! I love to be in contact with people, who have the passion for roses like I do. Sorry to read that 'Geoff Hamilton' didn't do well for you either and eventually died. Because this rose is so lovely, I wonder if it is worth to give it a second try?!

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  18. Awesome! I wish I could visit there some day. 'Crimson Glory'; what a beauty it is.

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    1. Hoover Boo, thanks, I hope your wish becomes reality. Mottisfont Abbey Rose Gardens is such a special place for any rose lover. 'Crimson Glory' was a totally stunning rose. I wonder, why I haven't noticed this rose in America. It is certainly not much talked about and I doubt that I ever have seen one in person in the US so far.

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  19. Liebe Christina,
    was für wundervolle Bilder über einen wundervollen Garten.
    Ich träume von einer Reise nach England und habe ihn auf meiner Wunschliste :-)
    Bin schon auf den Gartenteil mit historischen Rosen gespannt.
    Und viele der Austins habe ich auch - Geoff Hamilton und The Pilgrim zum Beispiel.
    Ich mag sie sehr :-)
    Ganz viele liebe Sonntagsgrüße
    sendet dir Urte

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  20. A fabulous post while we're anxiously waiting for winter to pass! This is one place I would love to visit. It must have been incredible - and the scent heavenly! I am intrigued by the roses grown on the wall. I would love to have that affect somewhere in my garden (uh, oh, you just gave me an idea!). I love the purple and yellow combination together. And, of course, the perennials add so much.

    I really am going to give this look a try! It would be perfect for outside my vegetable garden, trained upon the fencing. Christina, you always give me such grand ideas! :)

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  21. Sorry, dass ich dir mit der Kletterrose nicht helfen konnte. Aber schau dir doch bei HMF die Tee-Rose 'Mrs. B.R. Cant' an, da sind 2 Bilder dabei, umwerfend! Aus Pittsworth, Queensland, Australien und vom Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond VA. Wenn ich das Klima hätte, sie würde einen Extra-Platz bei mir haben!!!
    Viele Grüße
    Rudolf

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  22. Thank you for all those wonderful photos. I can't wait to go back again later this year. I agree with you about the specimens in the entrance area. It had an odd feel, rather "Alice in Wonderland" like. It might have been better to build arches to make a tunnel, or join them along the length to make a sort of wall of roses. It's an amazing place anyway! xx

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  23. Christina-thank you for visiting my blog and for showing us these beautiful roses. Mottisfont is such an absolutely amazing place and you have photographed each rose so perfectly. I did a little searching through my rose catalogues for you and could the rose on the wall possibly be Aloha Climbing Rose (Rosa 'Aloha')? Again thank you for the virtual tour. I so enjoyed it on this snowy winter's day!

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  24. What a beautiful rose garden. Chianti is a stunner. I think the David Austin roses are beautiful but alas they don't do well in our humid climate without spraying. They look gorgeous in England though! That small white polyantha looks like Marie Pavie.

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  25. So incredibly gorgeous! All roses just seem more beautiful when photographed in England. :o)

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  26. Thank you for the tour, it was great to see so many gorgeous roses. Somehow English roses look the best in England :).

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  27. Great photos. I am looking forward to visiting again l went a long time ago and remembered going to a handmade soap shop nearby.

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  28. I love the wall nearly as much as the roses! Thanks for becoming my 100th follower!

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  29. Gorgeous photos! I think the stunning copper/cherry climber is Général Schablikine, an old climbing tea;

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  30. The first climber could be Vicomtesse Pierre du Fou. There are some pictures on Helpmefind, some taken in Mottisfont. I saw it in Pithiviers le Vieil at the Roseraie André Eve, the bloom and fragrance are wonderful.

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    1. Frederique, thanks for letting me know that the identity of the first climber could be 'Vicomtesse Pierre du Fou'. I would be particularly thrilled to know the name of this one, since it is such an amazing rose. I will be looking at the photos of 'Vicomtesse Pierre du Fou on HMF, when I have a moment of time. It would be so cool to be able to identify this rose with the help of a reader of my blog post two years after I have written the post! Many thanks again for your comment!

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